INFORMATION FOR ANGLERS

CHECK ON OUR SUSSEX COUNTRYWATCH WEBPAGE FOR ANGLING UPDATES IN THEIR NEWSLETTER

 

 Fishe.net was set up as a guide to help anglers find great coarse fisheries in the South East.

We now have hundreds of full fishery reports within the following counties: East and West Sussex, Kent, Surrey, Essex and Hampshire.

 

5 September 2019 UPDATE

Angling Trust Fisheries Enforcement Workshop (South East)
Saturday 5th October 2019

Brinsbury College, Brinsbury Campus Conference Suite, North Heath, Pulborough, West
Sussex, RH20 1DL.
In partnership with the Environment Agency and Police, the Angling Trust will be running six further Fisheries Enforcement Workshops this autumn.
Entirely funded by freshwater rod licences, these essential courses are FREE to attend.
Aimed at anglers, fishery owners and managers, angling club bailiffs and anyone with an interest in protecting fish and fisheries, these Workshops provide training from policing and enforcement professionals.
These are full days, running between 0900 – 1630 hours (approx.)
Tea and coffee will be served free throughout but delegates need to bring their own packed lunch and refreshments. See FAQs
Course content covers:-
Fisheries Enforcement Campaign
Theft Act: Fishing Without Permission and Fish Theft
EA Fisheries Enforcement
Best Practice for Water Bailiffs
Nets, Lines & Traps
Migrant Anglers: Building Bridges Project
Health & Safety/Risk Assessment
Conflict Resolution
Wildlife & Rural Crime Overview
For more information and booking your place for this free event please see below :

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/angling-trust-fisheries-enforcement-workshop-south-east-tickets-62577395675



Click here for advice on licences

“You need a rod fishing licence in England, Scotland and Wales if you want to be legally able to fish for salmon, trout, freshwater fish, smelt or eel with a fishing rod. If you are caught without fishing without a licence you could be prosecuted and get up to a £2,500 fine.

You must always carry your fishing licence or your fishing licence reference number that we will provide you after you order has been successfully completed

Every year nearly 1,000,000 people purchase a fishing licence. This raises funds for the environmental agency, that allows them to improve and preserve your favourite fishing spots. By purchasing a fishing licence, you are ensuring that our ponds, lakes and waterways are kept in the best condition possible.

We assist you in obtaining your rod fishing licence through out speedy and easy to use online application, please choose the type of fishing licence you need below and start your applications today with immediate confirmation so you could be fishing within hours”

When you need a licence

You need a rod fishing licence to fish for salmon, trout, freshwater fish, smelt or eel with a rod and line in:

  • England (except the River Tweed)
  • Wales
  • the Border Esk region of Scotland

You must always carry your rod fishing licence when you’re fishing or you could be prosecuted.

You can be fined up to £2,500 for fishing without a rod fishing licence

 Licences for children aged between 13 and 16 are free – you’ll still need to get a junior licence

You may also need:permission from the landowner if you’re fishing on private land an additional licence to fish in locks or weirs on the River Thames

You must follow national and local rules (byelaws) when freshwater fishing with a rod and line in England and Wales.

Prices

Licence type

Trout and coarse 2-rod Trout and coarse 3-rod Salmon and sea trout

1-day

£6

Not available

£12

8-day

£12 Not available £27

12-month

£30

£45

£82

12-month – over 65 or disabled

£20

£30

£54

12-month – junior (13 to 16) Free Free

Free

You can get a 12-month disabled person’s licence if you’ve got a Blue Badge, or you get Disability Living Allowance or Personal Independence Payment (any rate) – you’ll need your National Insurance number to prove this.

You can also get a discounted 12-month licence if you’re over 65. You can’t get a discount for a 1-day or an 8-day licence.

14 days of buying it. You’ll need to buy a new licence but you’ll get a refund for the first one you bought.

To change a 1-day or 8-day licence to a 12-month licence, call the Environment Agency within 14 days of buying it. You’ll need to buy a new licence but you’ll get a refund for the first one you bought.

What Type Of Fishing Licence Do I Need?

There are two main types of fishing licence available to purchase. You should choose and purchase the correct fishing licence depending on what type of fishing you will be doing. Below you will find details of the two different types of licence and their duration variations available to purchase.

There are variations in these main two types of licences but these are just the period of time your licence is valid for and discounts for over 65s and disabled.

Trout, coarse fish and eel licence

This lets you fish non-migratory trout and all freshwater fish.

You must use your licence in one of the following ways. You can choose to fish with:

  • 1 rod for non-migratory trout in rivers, streams, drains and canals
  • up to 2 rods for non-migratory trout in reservoirs, lakes and ponds
  • up to 2 rods for freshwater fish

You can also buy a 12-month licence that lets you use 3 rods for freshwater fish.

The place where you fish may have additional rules about how many rods you can use there.

Salmon and sea trout licence

This lets you fish salmon, sea trout, non-migratory trout and all freshwater fish.

You must use your licence in one of 3 ways. You can choose to fish with:

  • 1 rod for salmon, sea trout and non-migratory trout in rivers, streams and canals
  • up to 2 rods for salmon, sea trout and non-migratory trout in reservoirs, lakes and ponds
  • up to 3 rods for freshwater fish

The place where you fish may have additional rules about how many rods you can use there.

Rods that aren’t affected by licence limits

The following rods aren’t affected by licence limits unless they have hooks attached:

  • spod rods (used to propel bait into water)
  • marker rods (used to mark out lines

 



1 November 2018

Angling Trust urges government to deliver a real ‘Brexit Dividend’ for UK fisheries

The Angling Trust is pleased to see the government bringing forward its long awaited Fisheries Billsetting out the future management of UK waters following our withdrawal from the European Union but doubts that it will deliver the promised ‘Brexit Dividend’.

 

The Trust welcomes the acknowledgement of recreational sea angling for the first time in UK legislation but is disappointed to see that proposals support the continuation of the existing system of allocating fishing quotas. An opportunity is being missed to radically reform how access to a public resource is allocated. We argued that the government should give notice of ‘reasonable expectation’ to existing quota beneficiaries in order that the UK can be free to allocate fishing opportunities based on the concept of optimal utilisation where social, economic and environmental criteria are assessed and fishing opportunities granted based on these principles. This would mean more fish for the economically significant sea angling sector and better marine conservation.

 

The new Fisheries Bill, which was published today, states:

 

  • The Fisheries Bill is a major milestone in delivering our promise to take back control of our waters, and decide who may fish in our waters and on what terms.
  • It creates the powers to build a sustainable and profitable fishing industry, one which is in the best interests of the whole UK and future generations.
  • The Bill delivers a Green Brexit by extending powers to protect and enhance our precious marine environment.

 

A recent Greenpeace reportUnearthed, revealed that failure to reform the system for allocating quota: “would leave 29% of the UK’s fishing quota in the hands of just five families on the Sunday Times Rich List – and around half of England’s quota in the hands of overseas interests.”

 

Back in July the Angling Trust produced a comprehensive submission to the Fisheries White Paper which argued for:

 

  • An end to the effective privatisation of a public resource into the hands of a few commercial interests.
  • A new fishery management regime that applied the optimal use of fishery resources recognising the far greater economic benefits of recreational sea angling over pure commercial harvesting.
  • Adopting best practice from overseas including the legal obligation to rebuild over fished stocks.
  • Sustainable public access to a public resource for both recreation and amenity.
  • More resources for enforcement and conservation and a reform of the IFCAs and MMO.
  • The designation of recreational only species such as wrasse, bass, tope, smoothound and flounder to deliver optimal benefits.
  • The incentivising of sustainable, low impact fishing, including angling, to support jobs and coastal communities rather than simply using additional quota as a financial instrument by allocating fishing opportunities to the highest bidder.

 

Martin Salter, Head of Campaigns at the Angling Trust said: “It’s abundantly clear that the Fisheries Bill has been rushed out this week to demonstrate that ministers have been addressing some of the future challenges and opportunities that will arise from the UK leaving the European Union. However, the disappointingly timid nature of this Bill as currently proposed means there is likely to be precious little by way of a Brexit dividend for either recreational sea angling or conservation. The failure to commit to reform the discredited quota system means that the privatisation of our publicly owned fish stocks continues as before. Leaving 29% of the UK’s fishing quota in the hands of just five rich families and around half of England’s quota in the hands of overseas interests is hardly ‘taking back control’.”

 

He added: “Whilst we welcome the recognition of sea angling on the face of the Bill and the commitment to consider allocating ‘new fishing opportunities” and grants our sector, without major reform of commercial over fishing we fear that this might see anglers and conservationist scrabbling around for ‘a few fish flavoured crumbs’ after the harvesters have filled their nets.”

 

The Angling Trust is shortly to meet with senior officials at Defra to go through the new Bill in detail to seek clarification and reassurance and to suggest potential improvements.